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Final Midterm Election Has Major Consequences – The Georgia Showdown Will Determine Dem’s Investigation Subpoena Power
By Jon Brenner|December 3, 2022
Final Midterm Election Has Major Consequences – The Georgia Showdown Will Determine Dem’s Investigation Subpoena Power

What’s Happening:

Did you think the stakes were over for the 2022 midterms? Think again.

Yes, the Republicans have clinched control of the House, and Democrats have scored 50 seats in the Senate, which, along with the Vice-President’s tie-breaking vote, gives them an effective Senate majority.

But one race still hangs in the balance: the Georgia runoff between Herschel Walker and Raphael Warnock. Many are writing this race off since it won’t change the balance of power. But it turns out it could have a significant effect on the Washington circus. From Axios:

Democrats have already clinched control of the Senate, but the difference between 50 and 51 seats will play a major role in their ability to counter the new House Republican majority’s priority: investigations.

Why it matters: Adding a Senate seat in the Dec. 6 Georgia runoff would give Democrats more investigative resources and — crucially — nearly unilateral power to issue subpoenas without Republican buy-in.

  • Priorities for Democratic investigations could include “climate issues, President Trump and his family, and election issues,” said Alyssa DaCunha, co-chair of WilmerHale’s congressional investigations practice.

The intrigue: Senate Democrats could also pursue their own investigation into the Jan. 6 insurrection and build on the work of the House Jan. 6 committee, which is set to dissolve at the end of the current Congress.

All that may seem wonky at first, but based on how Democrats have run Congress and investigations over the last two years, it could become be a complete PR disaster for the Republicans.

If a 51st vote gives Democrats the ability to unilaterally run investigations and issue subpoenas without Republican support, they could continue the January 6th investigations in some manner. They could continue to badger Donald Trump and “counterprogram” critical investigations by the Republicans into Hunter Biden’s business dealings, crime, and the border.

We get it—politics is politics. But it seems the Democratic Party is willing to do just about anything politically get what they want. They literally stretched a public one-sided investigation all the way up to the 2022 midterms, obviously for the electoral benefit.

And the last thing we want to watch during this gridlocked session is dueling investigations, continuing to drone on about the 2020 election and nitpicking at every little detail in Trump’s life to try to keep him from running in 2024.

Americans are tired of the stage play. They want solutions to the major problems in our nation. They also have low expectations for the Washington swamp to get much done now that House Republicans can put a stop to Biden’s liberal agenda.

But they don’t want to hear endless racket and grandstanding about the past, instead of looking to solutions for the future.

So, this Georgia runoff really does have a lot riding on it—at least for the sanity of average Americans.

Key Takeaways:

  • Biden is trying to make South Carolina the first state in the Democratic primaries.
  • He is doing this to return a favor to Rep. Jim Clyburn, his ally.
  • This would also give Biden a strong advantage since he would South Carolina in 2020.

Source: Axios

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Jon Brenner
Patriot Journal's Managing Editor has followed politics since he was a kid, with Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush as his role models. He hopes to see America return to limited government and the founding principles that made it the greatest nation in history.
Patriot Journal's Managing Editor has followed politics since he was a kid, with Ronald Reagan and George W. Bush as his role models. He hopes to see America return to limited government and the founding principles that made it the greatest nation in history.
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