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2020 Election Investigation Erupts in Southern State – Multiple Counties Just Opened New Probes
By Ben Dutka|March 25, 2022
2020 Election Investigation Erupts in Southern State – Multiple Counties Just Opened New Probes

Election integrity remains a top priority for many American voters. After the 2020 presidential race, accusations of fraud and other widespread issues dominated headlines for months.

And in many cases, those issues have not been resolved. Perhaps one of the biggest concerns is who gets to vote — for example, many don’t believe undocumented residents should be able to cast a ballot.

Now, one state is looking into another group of questionable voters.

According to a new Politico report, multiple counties in Florida have opened investigations into whether or not convicted felons voted in the 2020 presidential election.

Understandably, these felons are ineligible to vote according to the law, but there’s a possibility that many were able to submit a ballot. This would be yet another black mark on America’s election integrity.

The issue arose when researcher Mark Glaeser cross-checked Florida voter lists against the state’s list for convicted sex offenders and felons in Alachua County.

Evidently, one election official in that district allegedly registered felons to vote at the county jail. And that might just be the tip of the iceberg, as multiple investigations are now kicking off.

According to part of the original report, as stated by Secretary of State Laurel Lee’s spokesperson, Mallory Morgan:

…it appears dozens of potentially illegal voters have been flagged in counties such as Alachua, Duval, Gadsden, Leon and Lake.

As such, it is quite possible that some individuals who voted in the 2020 General Election had not satisfied all legal financial obligations or were otherwise ineligible under the parameters of the restoration of voting rights framework.

Morgan says numerous counties have received information that can be forwarded to local prosecutors. And once that happens, we’ll learn a lot more about what really happened during that election process.

Back in 2018, Florida allowed up to 1.5 million convicted felons to vote, though that still didn’t include those who committed sex crimes or murder.

But this year, Gov. Ron DeSantis wanted to improve election integrity in the state, so he approved the Office of Election Crimes and Security. Many Florida residents saw it as a step in the right direction.

This office was created to “investigate, detect, apprehend, and arrest anyone for an alleged violation,” and they’d be accepting election fraud tips from the general public.

Then there’s the Public Interest Legal Foundation (PILF), which has discovered evidence that proved foreign nationals were on state voter rolls in places like New Jersey, California, and North Carolina.

PILF also noted that over 150 election crime referrals had been sent to county election officials in Florida, but no action had yet been taken.

Hopefully, all that is going to change now, and these investigations will yield results. If the citizens can’t rely on a stable and trustworthy election system, they’re less likely to trust any results.

After the 2020 election, there’s plenty of skepticism floating around. And it isn’t going away until we get more evidence and information.

Key Takeaways:

  • Multiple Florida counties have opened investigations into possible voter fraud in the 2020 election.
  • Allegations state that convicted felons might’ve illegally cast ballots.
  • Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis recently created the Office of Election Crimes and Security to improve election integrity in the state.

Source: Breitbart

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Ben Dutka
Ben S. Dutka is a journalist, writer and editor with over two decades of experience. He has worked with three newspapers and eight online publications, and he has also won a Connecticut short story contest entitled Art as Muse, Imaginary Realms. He has a penchant for writing, rowing, reading, video games, and Objectivism.
Ben S. Dutka is a journalist, writer and editor with over two decades of experience. He has worked with three newspapers and eight online publications, and he has also won a Connecticut short story contest entitled Art as Muse, Imaginary Realms. He has a penchant for writing, rowing, reading, video games, and Objectivism.
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